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Evidence-Informed Webinar Series

The Evidence-Informed Webinar Series is presented by the Research and Training Network (RTN), a collaborative of California university and Human Services Agency representatives that promotes agency/university partnerships with the purpose of establishing a comprehensive strategy for practice-oriented research in the Human Services.

Partners present their research, reports, curricula, and literature reviews in an effort to disseminate their research-based work to a larger audience. The webinars here highlight the work that is being done in California.  

RELATED: Visit the Research and Training Network (RTN) page.
RELATED: Be a presenter! View or download the Presenter Form.

 


CalYOUTH: Early Findings from the Youth Survey, Child Welfare Worker Survey, and Administrative Data Analyses
Date: 
September 22, 2015
Presenter: Nathanael Okpych, M.S.W., M.A., CalYOUTH Project Director
Description: 
This webinar will incorporate key findings from existing data that have been collected by the CalYOUTH Study. Findings from the baseline youth survey and the first caseworker survey will cover topics such as youth outcomes in a number of domains (e.g., education, relationships and social support, mental health), the need for transitional living services in a number of domains, and attitudes toward extended care. Preliminary findings from administrative data analyses will examine if and how extended foster care has affected youths’ permanency outcomes by age 18 and rates of postsecondary enrollment by age 19.5. More information about the CalYOUTH study and written reports can be found at:  http://www.chapinhall.org/research/report/findings-california-youth-transitions-adulthood-study-calyouth

Archived Recording; PowerPoint Presentation


Predictors and Health Consequences of Secondary Traumatic Stress among Public Child Welfare Workers
Date: September 17, 2015
Presenters: 
Holly Bowers, Ph.D., Senior Academic Researcher, UC Davis Center for the Humanities, NCTA, and Susan Brooks, M.S.W., Director of the NCTA, University of California Davis Extension
Description: 
This webinar presents information obtained from public child welfare workers who self-selected to participate in a worker health survey examining the associations between secondary traumatic stress, individual and work factors, and general health outcomes. These public child welfare workers were surveyed during professional development training classes that took place in Northern California. Findings revealed  that public child welfare workers experiencing higher levels of secondary traumatic symptoms is related to poorer health outcomes and having an increased desire to leave their current place of work. Stemming from these findings the NCTA is developing resources to deliver online training curricula and peer support in an effort to improve the physical and emotional health of public child welfare workers.

Archived Recording; PowerPoint Presentation


Continuous Quality Improvement: Definitions, Key Components, and Emerging Developments in the Child Welfare Landscape
Date: June 17, 2015
Presenter: 
Daniel Webster, Ph.D., Research Specialist, Center for Social Services Research (CSSR), University of California, Berkeley 
Description: This presentation will introduce participants to basic elements of Continuous Quality Improvement. The webinar will discuss the structure of an organization that supports CQI, as well as the cyclical process of identifying programmatic or policy strengths and weaknesses, planning, testing and applying evidence to evaluate solutions that promote system improvements.

Archived Recording, PowerPoint Presentation


Removing the Cloak of Secrecy: Understanding the Clinical Needs of Adoption and Guardianship Families
Date: 
June 15, 2015
Presenters: Ruth McRoy, Ph.D., Donahue and DiFelice Endowed Professor, Boston College Graduate School of Social Work; Carol Bishop, LMFT, Statewide Adoption Policy Director, Seneca Family of Agencies/Kinship Center; Karen Gunderson, California Department of Social Services (CDSS); and Debbie Schugg, Consultant, National Center on Adoption and Permanency, Parent Recruiter, Kinship Center
Description: Children entering families through adoption and guardianship bring with them a history of grief, loss, and often trauma. This is especially true of children formerly in foster care. Recently, increasing attention is being paid to the special needs of these families and, in particular, how mental health and other support services tailored to adoptive families can effectively help children heal and achieve success at home, at school, and in the community.

This webinar will focus on the history and research that have led to a more enlightened understanding of the clinical needs of adoption and guardianship families—why this is such a complex issue and what is being done to improve clinical and other support services. In addition, it will discuss training and practice models that are being developed or currently used to address the need for adoption-competent clinical services. Finally, the webinar will include a personal testimonial from one adoptive family who struggled to get access to appropriate services, as well as an overview of the AB1790 legislation that is propelling this issue forward in California.

Archived Recording, PowerPoint Presentation


Organizational Change
Date: March 26, 2015
Presenter: Tom Packard, D.S.W., Professor, San Diego State University
Description: Expectations for organizational change are essentially constant in human service organizations. Examples include implementation of initiatives, including AB 12, Katie A./Pathways to Well-Being, Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI), and the California Core Practice Model, and implementation science processes.

This webinar will present research including content analysis of the literature on organizational change and an evidence-based phase model of organizational change which covers organizational change tactics, change leadership roles, and organizational change methods. Case examples of organizational change processes will be presented.

This webinar should be useful to human service organization executives, managers, consultants, analysts, and other staff support professionals as well as line workers interested in organizational change. It will be specifically designed for those serving in official roles as change leaders in their organizations.

Archived Recording, PowerPoint Presentation


Child Welfare Information Gateway: Your Source for Child Welfare Resources, Tools and Information
Date:
March 5, 2015
Presenter: Elizabeth Mertinko, M.S.W., Operations Manager, Child Welfare Information Gatewayhome page of Child Welfare Information Gateway
Description: The Child Welfare Information Gateway connects child welfare and related professionals to comprehensive information and resources to help protect children and strengthen families. It features the latest on topics from prevention to permanency, including child abuse and neglect, foster care, and adoption.

This webinar will present an introduction and overview of the new Child Welfare Information Gateway,https//www.childwelfare.gov/. It will provide a short guided tour of the Information Gateway's new design ad enhanced navigation, streamlining how child welfare professional search and locate the tools, publications, and data they need.

Archived Recording


Commercial Sexual Exploitation of ChildrenClick to hear recording of Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children (CSEC)
(CSEC)

Date: October 28, 2014
Presenters: Karissa Hughes, M.S.W., Research and Development Coordinator, Academy for Professional Excellence, San Diego State University School of Social Work; Anzette Shackelford, M.S.W., Public Child Welfare Training Academy County Consultant, Academy for Professional Excellence, San Diego State University School of Social Work; and Tenia Davis, M.S.W., Curriculum and Evaluation Analyst, California Social Work Education Center (CalSWEC) 
Description: The goal of the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children (CSEC) is to raise awareness throughout the state and the child welfare community on the issue of Human Trafficking, specifically the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children. 

The Academy for Professional Excellence has conducted a thorough literature review on Commercial Sexual Exploitation, which it published in February of 2014.  The California Social Work Education Center (CalSWEC) has conducted a thorough literature review on Childhood Maltreatment indicators and has generated an accompanying PowerPoint on the CSEC.  This webinar will present findings from both reviews and ongoing research on the topic with a narrow focus on CSEC and Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking (DMST).  The implications for the child welfare system; current federal, state, and local efforts to address trafficking; background information on factors contributing to the recruitment and ongoing victimization of young people; identification, assessment, and promising intervention strategies; effective multi-system responses to work with victims; and national and local resources will be covered.

Archived Recording, PowerPoint Presentation

Supplemental Materials:


CalYOUTH: Early Findings from the Child Welfare Worker Survey
Date: September 23, 2014
Presenter: Pajarita Charles, Ph.D., CalYOUTH Project Director, School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago
Description: The California Youth Transitions to Adulthood Study (CalYOUTH) is an evaluation of the impact of AB 12, the California Fostering Connections to Success Act, on outcomes during the transition to adulthood for foster youth. The study includes a collection of information from transition-age youth and child welfare workers, as well as analysis of government program data. The study, directed by Dr. Mark Courtney from the University of Chicago and conducted in collaboration with the California Department of Social Services and County Welfare Directors Association, is being carried out over a 5-year period and is following youth ages 16-17 through age 21 using in-person interviews to complete three waves of surveys. To date, both a baseline child welfare worker survey and youth survey have been completed, in addition to qualitative interviews and observations of young people's living arrangements in foster care.


Improving Outcomes for African American Males Involved with Child WelfareImproving Outcomes for African American Males Involved with Child Welfare
Date: September 18, 2014
Presenters: Oronde A. Miller, Senior Associate, Center for the Study of Social Policy, and Erwin McEwen, Senior Director, Technical Assistance Unit, Casey Family Programs
Description: A growing number of child welfare agencies and organizations are working to understand and undo the pattern of racial disproportionality and disparate outcomes among children and families involved with this nation’s child welfare systems. Less attention, however, has been given to the particular experiences of African American boys and young men.

This webinar will review what is known about the experiences of African American males involved with child welfare and the key elements of organizational and system improvement strategies aimed at improving their experiences and outcomes. System improvement strategies include those that are evidence-informed, with a focus on family-centered, trauma-informed, and strengths-based interventions with youth and their families, as well as organizational operation approaches that are culturally responsive and that respond to the experiences of race and racism in the lives of African American males and their families.

Archived RecordingPowerPoint Presentation


Child Welfare Partnership for Research and Training

Child Welfare Partnership for Research and Training 
Date: July 24, 2014 
Presenters: Laurie Drabble, Ph.D., Professor,San José State University School of Social Work, and Director, SJSU Institute for Community Partnered Research (ICPR); Barbara Watkins, M.S.W., Santa Clara County Social Services Agency; Darlene Da Silva, M.S.W.
Description: The Child Welfare Partnership for Research and Training (CW-PART) is a collaborative project of the SJSU School of Social Work and two counties, Santa Clara and Santa Cruz. The model provides a situated learning environment for IV-E and other interested students where teams conduct applied research on issues of immediate relevance to the county or partnered agencies. 

This workshop describes core elements of the partnered research model, roles of different stakeholders, and "lessons learned" for adaptation to other county and university contexts. Findings from qualitative interviews and stakeholder surveys suggest that county partners perceive the partnership as valuable and that students in partnered research teams are more likely than other students to report researching a problem or issue that is directly relevant to the agency interested in being a part of research and evaluation in the future. The structure and impact of the partnered models will be illustrated through highlights from: a trauma-informed systems change initiative outcomes and processes in differential response services.

Archived Recording, PowerPoint Presentation


A Strengths-based Approach to Supervised Visitation in Child Welfare

A Strengths-based Approach to Supervised Visitation in Child Welfare 
Date: July 15, 2014
Presenters:  Valerie Shapiro, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, School of Social Welfare, University of California, Berkeley, and Heidi Sims, Administrator of Family Preservation Department of SCAN (Stop Child Abuse & Neglect), Fort Wayne, Indiana
Description: Supervised visitation gives parents accused of abuse or neglect the opportunity to spend time with children temporarily removed from their care. Although supervised visitation has the potential to be a tool for promoting successful reunification by maintaining or growing caregiver relationships with children, and pursuing and monitoring caregiver skill acquisition, the risk-management objective that underlies child protection services creates a challenging context for strengths-based approaches.

This presentation will describe a strengths-based approach to supervised visitation within the child welfare system. It articulates a practice model that navigates the tension between the dual aims of child welfare services: risk management and fostering change that leads to a successful reunification. This model embraces resilience theory, grounded in strengths-based strategies to build protective factors.

Moreover, this presentation describes the collaborative construction of the Joan Sherman Program for Resilient Children through the integration of insights from diverse stakeholders, research evidence, and strengths-based practice principles. Five aspects of the model will be described in depth: enhancing the visitation environment, strengths-based assessment, stable visitation routines, activities to promote resilience, and progress check-ups. The presentation will also describe the training program developed to build workforce capacity and support model implementation. It will conclude by reflecting upon the successes of, and challenges to, the implementation of a strengths-based approach to supervised visitation.

Archived Recording, PowerPoint Presentation


Promoting Highly Effective Foster Care: A Research Review

Promoting Highly Effective Foster Care: A Research Review 
Date: June 3, 2014
Presenter: Jill Duerr Berrick, Ph.D., M.S.W., Professor, School of Social Welfare, University of California, Berkeley 
Description: Foster care serves as the backbone of out-of-home care, yet relatively little research examines the qualities necessary to promote effective care. This webinar will review findings from various studies to highlight what is known about recruitment, screening, support, and retention of highly effective foster parents. Research, including a trans-national study of U.S. and Norwegian caregivers, highlights the characteristics of effective caregivers and the strategies agencies may employ to promote effective care.

Archived RecordingPowerPoint Presentation


Child Welfare Workers' Views on Physical Punishment of Children

Child Welfare Workers' Views on Physical Punishment of Children
Date:
 May 8, 2014
Presenters: Elizabeth Breshears, Ph.D., Associatie Professor, CSU Stanislaus, and Leisa Baltz, 2nd year M.S.W. student, CSU Stanislaus
Description: The opinions of U.S. child welfare workers—which appear to parallel the general public’s belief—that physical punishment is sometimes “necessary” pose a challenge to child welfare agencies in addressing best practices in parenting. Research conducted over the last 60 years provides a robust body of evidence that physical punishment of children is antithetical to best child rearing practices and is a high-risk parenting strategy. The only U.S. group for whom physical punishment remains legal is children. Perhaps it is time for child welfare agencies to facilitate a cultural shift in how we nurture and parent children. This webinar will compare policies on physical punishment of children in the U.S. and other developed countries, examine the knowledge and opinions of Central Valley child welfare workers on this issue, and review the NASW’s policy position.

Archived Recording, PowerPoint Presentation


Peer Mentors in Child Welfare: A Promising Practice toward Reunification

Peer Mentors in Child Welfare: A Promising Practice toward Reunification 
Date:
April 29, 2014
Presenter: Jill Duerr-Berrick, Ph.D., M.S.W., Professor, School of Social Welfare, University of California, Berkeley 
Description: The frequent use of peer mentors in the fields of health and mental health is gaining traction in child welfare as well. This presentation will review what we know about the promise of peer mentors in child welfare, particularly in our efforts to engage families and to work toward reunification. The presenter’s research in Contra Costa County will be highlighted, drawing upon key informant interviews and a quasi-experimental study of reunification outcomes. Findings from the study are promising and suggest benefits that may be associated with the use of peer mentors.

Archived Recording, PowerPoint presentation


Implementation Teams

Implementation Teams
Date: March 27, 2014
Presenter: Lynne Marsenich, Western Implementation Research and Evaluation
Description: The webinar will focus on the role and function of implementation teams. Three different types of implementation teams will be discussed:

  1. developers of evidence-based practices and programs;
  2. intermediary organizations that help others implement a variety of evidence-based programs, and
  3. community and/or organizational implementation teams.  
    Information on two specific implementation team approaches will be presented: learning collaboratives and Community Development Team.

Archived Recording, PowerPoint Presentation


The Real Meaning of Fidelity in Implementation Science

The Real Meaning of Fidelity in Implementation Science
Date:
 January 23, 2014
Presenters: Dean Fixsen, Ph.D.,  and Sonja Schoenwald, Ph.D.
Desription: There is an increased focus on comparative effectiveness, accountability for outcomes, and consumer choice across public service sectors at the federal level, and in many states. At the same time, treatments and services with demonstrated effectiveness are increasingly becoming available in a variety of practice contexts. In this context, it is increasingly important to be able to answer the question "When we ask and pay for a service, how do we know that we are getting what we asked and paid for?"

Fidelity is one indicator that a particular treatment or service is being implemented as intended with the particular populations that the treatment or service has been shown to benefit. Tools to measure fidelity can be used to improve implementation and outcomes. This webinar will focus on what fidelity means, what research tells us about why and how it matters, and what we know and have yet to learn about tools to measure and support it in community practice contexts. 

Archived Recording, PowerPoint Presentation


California's Most Vulnerable Parents: A Population-Based Examination of Youth Involved with Child Protective Services

California's Most Vulnerable Parents: A Population-Based Examination of Youth Involved with Child Protective Services
Date
: January 9, 2014 
Presenters: Emily Putnam-Hornstein, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, USC School of Social Work, Principal Investigator at the Children's Data Network and Researcher at the CA Child Welfare Indicators Project, and Bryn King, Doctoral Candidate, UC Berkeley, School of Social Welfare, and Graduate Student Researcher, CA Child Welfare Indicators Project 
Description: This webinar will describe and discuss findings to emerge from the recently released study on "California's Most Vulnerable Parents: A Population-Based Examination of Youth Involved with Children Protective Services." This research was funded by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation and conducted by researchers at USC and UC Berkeley in collaboration with the California Department of Social Services.

The project involved the linkage of roughly 1.4 million California birth records with 1 million child protection records to characterize the teen birth rates of adolescent girls with a history of maltreatment. Additional linkages allowed for the examination of maltreatment outcomes among children born to teen mothers. These new data document that 1 in 4 teens in foster care give birth before age 20 and as many as 40% of these young mothers have a second child during their teens. In the population overall, 4 in 10 teen mothers have been reported as alleged victims of abuse or neglect before pregnancy and 20% have a history of substantiated maltreatment. Children born to teens with a history of maltreatment victimization are abused and neglected at twice the rate of children whose teen mothers had no CPS involvement.

Archived Recording, PowerPoint Presentation


Implementation Science 101Implementation Science 101
Date: October 24, 2013 
Presenters: Stuart Oppenheim, M.S.W., Executive Director, Child and Family Policy Institute of California (CFPIC); Sevaughn Banks, Ph.D., Training and Evidence-Based Practice Specialist, California Social Work Education Center (CalSWEC); and Lynne Marsenich, LCSW, Western Implementation Research and Evaluation 
Description: This webinar provides an overview of the link between evidence-based practice and the importance of implementation science (IS).  It provides key features of three implementation science frameworks:

  1. Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR),
  2. the National Implementation Research Network (NIRN), and
  3. Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (EPIS)

It furtherprovides information about common concepts related to IS.  The webinar provides tangible examples of application of IS principles in the field. In addition, attendees will become familiar with resources that are available for further study.   

Archived Recording, PowerPoint Presentation


Child Welfare Outcomes for Mexican and Vietnamese Immigrant Children Child Welfare Outcomes for Mexican and Vietnamese Immigrant Children
Date: July 18, 2013
Presenters: Kathy Lemon, Associate Professor, Ph.D., and Meekyung Han, Ph.D., Associate Professor, both at San José State University School of Social Work
Description: This webinar will describe findings from a CalSWEC-funded study exploring the experiences of Mexican immigrant and Vietnamese immigrant children and families involved in the child welfare system, and factors that influence reunification among these populations.  

Archived Recording, PowerPoint Presentation


Communities of Practice and Motivational Interviewing

Communities of Practice and Motivational Interviewing
Date: 
April 24, 2013 
Presenter: Melinda Hohman, Ph.D., Professor, San Diego State University School of Social Work 
Description:  Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices remains a large issue within social services. Research has shown that skills are lost or not used at all after training. This webinar will review the research about implementation science with a particular focus on developing resources for coaching and feedback, either within an agency setting or as a self-run group composed of voluntary practitioners from the community. The use of Communities of Practice for Motivational Interviewing (MI) will be the specific example throughout this presentation.

Archived Recording, PowerPoint Presentation


How the Perspective of Fathers Contributes to Disproportionality: A Real Discussion

How the Perspective of Fathers Contributes to Disproportionality: A Real Discussion
Date: April 22, 2013
Presenters: Kilolo Brodie, Ph.D., CSU Stanislaus, and Natasha Paddock, Regional Director, Region C, NASW 
Description: A visible pattern in child welfare is the diminished role of fathers and marginalization of their importance. The purpose of this study was to exam barriers to father involvement, including institutional obstacles and gender bias (as the majority of child welfare workers are female). To obtain the perspective of fathers, researchers collected quantitative and qualitative data from men in a mandated parenting class in the Bay Area. All of the participants were men of color. Responses indicated that the majority did not feel they were treated the same as the mother of their children.

Archived RecordingPowerPoint Presentation


Use of Mental Health Services and Psychiatric Medications in Juvenile Detention Facilities and the Impact of State Placement Policy

Use of Mental Health Services and Psychiatric Medications in Juvenile Detention Facilities and the Impact of State Placement Policy 
Date: January 23, 2012 
Presenter Edward Cohen, Ph.D., Associate Professor, San José State University School of Social Work 
Description: The use of psychotropic medications is a significant factor in the overall effort to respond to detained youth with mental illness, who are over-represented in juvenile detention facilities. This presentation reports on the proportion of these youth who receive mental health services and psychotropic medications in California. Also covered is the impact on these proportions of the state’s juvenile justice realignment—the transfer of non-violent juvenile offenders from state placements to counties. Findings from a recent survey of counties will also be used to provide the context for the impact of this policy decision on county agencies.

Archived Recording


Race, Poverty, and Nativity: An Examination of Risk and Protective Factors for Child Welfare Involvement

Race, Poverty, and Nativity: An Examination of Risk and Protective Factors for Child Welfare Involvement
Date:
 June 11, 2012 
Presenters: Barbara Needell, Ph.D., M.S.W., and Emily Putnam-Hornstein, Ph.D., M.S.W., Center for Social Services Research (CSSR) 
Description: Race and ethnicity are widely viewed as markers for a complex interaction of economic, social, political, and environmental factors that influence the health of individuals and communities. This webinar explored differences in children’s risk of maltreatment by race/ethnicity, socioeconomic indicators, and maternal nativity. Racial disparities were examined in the areas of referrals received by CPS, substantiation rates, and entries to foster care. Participants learned about the newly developed racial disparity indices that incorporate race-specific poverty rates.

Archived RecordingPowerPoint Presentation


Child Maltreatment Fatalities—Risk Factors and Lessons Learned

Child Maltreatment Fatalities—Risk Factors and Lessons Learned
Date:
 June 7, 2012 
Presenters: Donna Pence, B.S., and Karissa Hughes, M.S.W., Academy for Professional Excellence 
Description: Attendees learned about common variables that may contribute to a higher probability of fatal child maltreatment, including: child risk factors, perpetrator profiles, social worker errors, environmental factors, etc. Lessons learned and practice recommendations were shared for how child welfare agencies can strengthen child fatality investigations and minimize placing children at risk of extreme harm.

PowerPoint presentationBibliographyQ&A


Improving Reunification Service Delivery in California: Implications from Two Recent Studies

Improving Reunification Service Delivery in California: Implications from Two Recent Studies
Date: 
March 29, 2012 
Presenter: Amy D’Andrade, Ph.D., MSW, San José State University School of Social Work
Description: Attendees learned about why California needs better service delivery models and what innovative approaches are currently in use in counties.

Agenda, PowerPoint presentation


Signs of Safety: Implementation and Evaluation

Signs of Safety: Implementation and Evaluation
Date: April 26, 2012 
Presenter: Holly Hatton, Ph.D., Northern California Training Academy 
Description: Attendees learned about what people in California are saying and doing to implement and evaluate Signs of Safety in child welfare.

Archived RecordingPowerPoint presentation