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Insights on Reunification Services, Use of Publicly Available Data for Student Research

A CalSWEC-funded project, "Understanding Models of Child Welfare Reunification Services Delivery in California Counties," has been completed by San Jose State University School of Social Work  Associate Professor Amy C. D’Andrade (pictured at near right).

This multi-year, multi-phase study partnered with counties across the state to examine the critical services provided by the child welfare system to support reunification of children and families involved in the child welfare system. 

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View or download the Executive Summary, full report, and 
PowerPoint presentation of this project.

Other completed CalSWEC-funded projects can be found on the following page: 
Research-based Curriculum Products Funded by Research  & Development Committee

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Dr. D’Andrade, who presented her project at the May meeting of CalSWEC's Board of Directors, used qualitative and quantitative methods to meet the goals of the study, which were to:

  1. Identify models of reunification services delivery currently in use in California;
  2. Determine whether any of these models or their elements are associated with improved reunification outcomes; and
  3. Provide an in-depth description and exploration of promising models.

Also at the May meeting, University of Southern California Assistant Professor Emily Putnam-Hornstein (pictured at far right) presented a new research course, "Using Publicly Available Data to Engage IV-E Students in Research and Statistics: Instructional Modules." Besides Dr. Putnam-Hornstein, authors of the course are Dr. Barbara Needell, Dr. Bridgette Lery, Bryn King, M.S.W., and Wendy Weigmann, M.S.W.

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View or download the curriculum from Specialized Practice Areas.

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The curriculum is based on separate modules created to support MSW students' development of practical data analysis skills and statistical literacy. It offers a two-semester overview of possible topics and sample syllabus and draws upon the rich, publicly available child welfare data in California for teaching examples, data analysis exercises, and collaborative, agency-relevant student research projects.