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Fiscal & Funding Tools

OVERVIEW

In times of scarcity, finding money to fund new projects may be difficult because organizations are already taxed, and managers have to operate with stricter budget requirements. This is particularly true for the child welfare system; the same or similar level of productivity is expected of CPS with less resource allocations. A few potential funding sources for father engagement and father involvement may be available. Also, people have been able to secure funding for their father enhancement activities in some creative ways.


COST ANALYSIS

It may be wise to conduct a cost analysis before, during and after implementation of a new program, project or initiative to gain a better understanding of the total costs associated with program implementation.  The Children's Bureau provides short resource videos describing what a cost analysis is and why they are important.  They provide useful concepts associated with cost analysis, budgting and accounting.  The videos Cost Analysis in Program Evaluation (Part 1) and (Part 2) are available on the Children's Bureau website.


CURRENT FISCAL/FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES 

 The Child Abuse Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment (CAPIT)*
*This information is taken directly from the Child Abuse Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment factsheet, 2009.

The CAPIT Program consists of state general funds that CDSS provides to all of the counties for child abuse and prevention programs. Applicant agencies must demonstrate the existence of a 10% cash or in-kind match (other than funding provided by the CDSS), which will support the goals of child abuse and neglect prevention and intervention. Funding can be used to supplement, but not supplant, child welfare services.

The intent of the program is to encourage prevention and intervention programs by funding that agencies address needs of children at high risk of abuse or neglect and their families. Service priority is to be given to prevention programs provided through nonprofit agencies, including, where appropriate, programs that identify and provide services to isolated families, particularly those with children five years of age or younger. Service priority is also to be given to high-quality home visiting programs based on research-based models of best practice, and services to child victims of crime.

Projects funded by CAPIT should be selected through a competitive process. In order to be eligible for funding, agencies must provide evidence, submitted as part of the application, to demonstrate broad-based community support, including but not limited to:

  • the county welfare department
  • a public law enforcement agency
  • the county probation department
  • the county board of supervisors
  • the county public health department
  • the county mental health department
  • a school district

    View or download the Child Abuse Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment factsheet.

Questions may be directed to the Office of Child Abuse Prevention (OCAP), (916) 651-6960.

Community-Based Child Prevention Program (CBCAP)*
This information is taken directly from the Community-Based Child Prevention Program factsheet, 2009.

The Office of Child Abuse Prevention (OCAP), an office within the CDSS, is responsible for the oversight of CBCAP funds

The purpose of CBCAP is to:

  • Support community-based efforts to develop, operate, expand, enhance, and coordinate initiatives, programs, and activities to prevent child abuse and neglect
  • Support the coordination of resources and activities to better strengthen and support families to reduce the likelihood of child abuse and neglect
  • Foster an understanding, appreciation, and knowledge of diverse populations in order to be effective in preventing and treating child abuse and neglect

 Programs that are funded with CBCAP funds are expected to:

  • Give priority to effective community-based programs serving low-income communities and those serving young parents or parents with young children, including community-based child abuse and neglect prevention programs
  • Provide early, comprehensive support for parents
  • Promote the development of parenting skills, especially in young parents and parents with young children
  • Increase family stability
  • Improve access to other formal and informal resources and opportunities for assistance available within communities, including access to such resources and opportunities for unaccompanied homeless youth
  • Support the additional needs of families with children with disabilities through respite care and other services
  • Provide referrals to early health and developmental services
  • Offer assistance to families

The target population for the funds is vulnerable families with children that are at risk of abuse or neglect, including but not limited to:

  • Parents including pregnant or parenting teens who are dependents or wards of the court and whose child is not in care
  • Parents and/or children with disabilities
  • Racial and ethnic minorities
  • Members of underserved or underrepresented groups "
  • Fathers
  • Unaccompanied homeless youth
  • Homeless families and those at risk of homelessness
  • Adult former victims of child abuse and neglect or domestic violence

Counties participating in CBCAP are required to conduct a needs assessment, collaborate with others to maximize use of the funds, involve parents, provide child abuse and neglect services, and conduct an evaluation.

View or download the Community-Based Child Prevention Program factsheet.

Questions may be directed to the Office of Child Abuse Prevention (OCAP) at (916) 651-6960.


OTHER FUNDING SOURCES

  •  Capacity Building Grants - Strategies has been able to provide capacity building mini-grants to non-profit organizations that have been involved with increasing father engagement and making their organizations more friendly, responsive and inclusive of fathers. Those organizations have been involved in the Supporting Father Involvement (SFI) Project, a therapeutic and didactic project for fathers and couples. If you would like more information about the SFI project and or Strategies, visit the Strategies, Inc., website.
     
  • First Five - Some organizations have been able to secure funding for father engagement through their local First Five commissions. For more information about funding opportunities, please visit the First Five website.
     
  • Public Health Department - Some organizations have been able to secure funding for father engagement through their local public health departments. For more information, please visit the California Public Health Department website.
     
  • Mental Health Department - Some organizations have been able to secure funding for father engagement through their local mental health departments. For more information, please visit the California Department of Mental Health website.